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Series VPRS 1189
Inward Registered Correspondence I
About this Series Related Series Accessing the records in this Series
Date Range: Series 1851 - 1863
  Series in Custody 1851 - 1863
  Contents 1851 - 1863
Public Access: Open
Location: North Melbourne
Format of Records: Physical
 
Agency which created this SeriesAgency which created this Series
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Date Range Agency Title Agency Number
1851 - 1855 Colonial Secretary's Office VA 856
1855 - 1863 Chief Secretary's Department VA 475
Agency currently responsible for this SeriesAgency currently responsible for this Series
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Date Range Agency Title Agency Number
1979 - 1992 Ministry for Police and Emergency Services VA 421
Description of this SeriesDescription of this Series
  • How to use the Records
    s

    Correspondence in this series is arranged in annual single number order within subject areas.

    To research a broad topic, eg. Prisons 1853 - 1860

    Step 1 : Scan the Records Description List for this series as the correspondence is listed under the subject classifications used in the original registry system. If the subject is not listed follow the steps below.

    To research a specific subject or particular item of correspondence

    Step 1 : Consult the Index to Inwards Registered Correspondence (VPRS 1411) held in the Victorian Archives Building Search Room for the appropriate year to identify the registration number of the correspondence.

    Step 2 : Refer to the Registers of Inwards Correspondence (VPRS 1186) held in the Victorian Archives Building Search Room to determine the final registration number and subject classification under which the item was filed.

    Note: Because the correspondence from this series has been rearranged the correspondence may not always be located under its final or last registration number. Researchers should therefore search under both the registration number of the first letter within a top-numbered sequence as well as the registration number of the last letter.

    Step 3 : Scan the Records Description List for the subject classification and the year/file number under which the item should be located.

    Note: VPRS 1226 Supplementary Inward Registered Correspondence and VPRS 1192 Petitions should be checked for any correspondence which cannot be located in this series.

  • Function / Content
    This series consists of inward correspondence received by the Colonial Secretary's Office between 1851 and 1855 and by the Chief Secretary's Department between 1855 and 1863. The contents of the series derive from the nature of the functional responsibility of these agencies.

    From 1851 the Colonial Secretary was the chief official of the government and the entire business of the colony was conducted either directly or indirectly through him. The heads of the various departments did not possess any power of independent action nor of direct communication with the Lieutenant Governor, nor could one head of department effect action through communication with another, except through the Colonial Secretary. No expenditure could be incurred and no departmental change effected without the concurrence and recommendation of the Colonial Secretary, who was also the only medium of communication between the Lieutenant Governor and the public.

    In 1855 the central role of the Colonial Secretary passed to the Chief Secretary whose department co-ordinated, in addition to various departmental branches, a wide variety of other agencies not specifically assigned to other Ministers. The Department also co-ordinated the policy of government and acted as a channel of communication between departments.

    Functions administered directly or indirectly through the Colonial Secretary's Office/Chief Secretarys Department between 1851 and 1863 included :
    - census and statistics;
    - education;
    - goldfields administration and mining, including the Chinese on the goldfields;
    - health;
    - immigration;
    - libraries;
    - police administration and prisons;
    - protection of Aborigines;
    - management and sale of Crown Lands, including pastoral leases;
    - public works and buildings;
    - roads and bridges;
    - care and control of lunatics;
    - registration of births, deaths and marriages;
    - registration of theatre licences;
    - art gallery and museum;
    - agriculture;
    - defence;
    - elections;
    - Royal Botanic Gardens and Herbarium.

    In addition the Colonial/Chief Secretary controlled the house-keeping business of government, especially authorisation of expenditure, and the appointment of civil service officers.

    The correspondence can be roughly categorised as follows:

    CORRESPONDENCE FROM OTHER GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS/DEPARTMENTS

    Communications concerning the general business performed by a particular department.

    Communications relating to the expenditure within a department, including:
    - requisitions for stationery, printed forms, bedding, clothing, tents, tools, horses, arms, ammunition, etc. and requests for improved or additional accommodation, i.e. new buildings or additions to old ones
    - arrangements for the payment of salaries, applications for increased salaries, complaints against the non-payment of salaries, applications for allowances such as clothing, fuel, food, equipment, travelling expenses.

    Communications concerning civil service staff within a department, including
    - applications for employment, recommendations from heads of departments for additional employees or for specific appointments, notifications of acceptance by an appointee, intimation of sureties
    - resignations, dismissals and inquiries into allegations of unsuitability for office
    - applications for leave of absence.

    Returns supplied by heads of departments in response to circular letters, including:
    - biennial returns of appointments and leaves of absence granted within a department
    - annual estimates of probable expenditure within a department, and returns of expenditure for the previous year.
    - reports as to the state of a department, e.g. the Colonial Treasurer for a time sent weekly reports, the Chief Commissioner of the Gold Fields sent weekly reports, other officials only sent half-yearly or yearly reports.

    Communications regarding the preparation of papers asked for by the Legislative Council for presentation to the House, as points of information, or during an inquiry into a department.

    Communications regarding compilation of annual Blue Books from the returns received from each Department.

    SEMI-PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS CHURCHES, SCHOOLS,HOSPITALS, BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS

    The Colonial/Chief Secretary also received correspondence from organisations receiving grants of money from the government. These included churches, schools, hospitals, and benevolent institutions. Individual clergymen received remuneration for acting in the capacities of clergy to the gold fields and as Deputy Registrars of births, deaths and marriages for the Registrar General's department. Religious denominations received grants towards clerical stipends, and free land grants for the erection of churches and schools.

    APPOINTMENTS

    Apart from appointments to specific vacancies, often proceeding through heads of departments, general applications for appointments to the civil service were made to the Colonial Secretary's Office/Chief Secretarys Department.

    LICENCES

    Communications were received from parties seeking or holding licences of several types -storekeepers, brewers, publicans, entertainers, theatre licences etc.

    ELECTORAL OFFICERS (usually J.P.'s, Police Magistrates, Clerks of Petty Sessions)

    Although the Colonial Secretary was responsible for the execution of the Electoral Act, he delegated the responsibility of actively performing these duties to the Police Department officials associated with the Benches of Petty Sessions in the different districts, and to Mayors of Town Councils.

    TENDERS (Communications from parties holding contracts with government)

    The calling of tenders for government building, services such as mail contracts and fuel and food supplies, was authorised in the Colonial Secretary's Office. The project was approved, the notice calling for tenders authorised for publication in the Government Gazette, and terms of acceptance of the contract were drawn up for final approval.

    PERSONS AND PETITIONS

    Memorials, petitions, complaints, inquiries of the government by persons and associations of persons all passed through the Colonial Secretary's Office, whether addressed to heads of departments or the Lieutenant Governor. (see also VPRS 1192 Petitions)

    OTHER COLONIES AND THE COLONIAL AGENT GENERAL

    The Colonial Secretary was the official agent for communications on diverse matters with the other Australian colonies, and other British colonies.

    The Colonial Agent General represented the Victorian Government in London, and was mainly engaged in buying books and other requisitions on the Government's behalf, and supervising their shipment.

    GOVERNMENT GAZETTE

    An important adjunct to Government, the Victorian Government Gazette was published under the authority of the Colonial Secretary, for the Lieutenant Governor. All notices were forwarded to his office, and from there to the Government Printer.

    GRANTS-IN-AID

    The Chief Secretary's Department itself administered categories known as "Grants in Aid" to Botanical Gardens, Agricultural Societies, Municipal Councils, Benevolent Asylums and Hospitals, Scientific bodies, e.g. Board of Science, Geological Surveyor, Magnetic Survey, etc., and "Miscellaneous Services", e.g. maintenance of deserted children. The institutions receiving "Grants in aid" corresponded with the Chief Secretary who supervised the distribution of grants, and required regular returns of expenses.

    A special fund for the Maintenance of Deserted Children was administered by the Chief Secretary who delegated the practical responsibility to the Police Department.

  • Recordkeeping System
    OPERATION OF THE CENTRAL REGISTRY

    All correspondence received and sent by the Colonial/Chief Secretary's Department was registered and maintained by a central registry. The 1859 Report of the Commissioners Appointed to Inquire into and report upon the Civil Service of the Colony notes the importance of the work of the Registry Branch "...in a department whose business is so varied....the careful preservation and ready production of papers is the foundation of the proper transaction of the whole of the business".

    The course of business in the Branch is described briefly in the Report:

    "All correspondence is opened by the Under Secretary, and at once passed to the Registry, where each letter is perused by the Chief Clerk, who marks thereon what previous papers are required to make the subject complete and directs precedents to be looked up if necessary - it is then endorsed with a short but clear precis of its contents, entered in the General Register and numbered, the numbers of all previous papers on the subject being also noted in the Register. The papers are then sent to the Under Secretary or to the branch whose duty it would be to deal with them."

    The Registry Branch was under the control of the highest paid chief clerk, and the highest paid clerks. The Report went on to note:

    "The officer in charge of this branch is the Custodian of the Public Records, and is the general referee of the department, he possesses a thorough knowledge of the entire business of the office and in the event of the sickness or absence of the Under Secretary, is the next officer of the department "

    The work of the two assistant clerks is described:

    "The first of these compiles an elaborate index of all letters received, attends to letters referred out, has charge of a certain portion of the records, keeps the postage account, and makes out requisitions for supplies. The other is the Register Clerk who enters and numbers all inward papers in the General Register, keeps the register of letters referred from other departments [ie.]... the Blank Cover Reference Book, has the care of the other portion of the records of the office, and attends to letters referred outward."

    THE RECORDKEEPING SYSTEM

    The registry system introduced in July 1851 was essentially a continuation of the previous registry system used by the office of the Superintendent of the Port Phillip District. However, with the establishment of the new office a few pages were left blank in the register and a new number sequence was commenced under the headings "Colonial Secretary" and "Victoria" written across the top of the page. A new index book was also started.

    Each inward letter was, on receipt, registered and given a distinctive number for identification. This consisted of an annual single number, that is a sequential number with a year prefix. The numbering sequence recommenced at 1 at the start of each year. Thus the one-hundred and twenty-third item received in 1851 was given the number 51/123. The annual single number was allocated from a Register (VPRS 1186) which records the name and location of sender, date of receipt, precis of letter, the subject classification, and sometimes the date answered. The register also identifies the registration number of related outward correspondence.

    The correspondence was indexed by sender, by subject and by surname ( persons). The index (VPRS 1411) also records a precis of the letter, date received, and the registration number.

    With the increasing volume of correspondence being handled the task of registering and indexing grew apace. Perhaps as a solution to the problem alternate registers were introduced in 1852, identified within a year by an alpha symbol. It would seem that a register would be used for one day, and then indexed on the next while another register was in use. The registration numbers from 1852 include the alpha symbol of the register, eg. E 54/786 identifies the seven-hundred and eighty-sixth letter registered in volume E for 1854.

    Before being sent to action officers correspondence would be folded lengthways and placed within a blank page (or "docket") on which was written the date of receipt, the date of registration, a precis of the letter and the registration number. Minutes and memos referring the correspondence between action officers are also noted on the docket in accordance with the Regulations of Official Correspondence of 1851, no.12.

    In the previous annual single number system maintained in the Superintendents Office correspondence was filed in sequence according to registration number. The new registry system contained two major developments which affected how the correspondence was filed and retrieved.

    TOP-NUMBERING OF INWARD CORRESPONDENCE

    While the annual single number registration of correspondence continued, the use of top-numbering increased. Top-numbering refers to the practice of grouping together items of inward correspondence which relate to the same transaction to create files. The method adopted was that of placing earlier correspondence under later ones. Thus if there was a subsequent letter registered 51/725 on the same transaction as a letter registered 51/123, the earlier letter would be filed with the later one and there would in fact be no correspondence filed under 51/123.

    While this top-numbering of files was developing the last column of the 1851 register (VPRS 1186) has the annotation "See later letter" in red ink to indicate top-numbering had occurred. The registration number of the previous correspondence is marked in the far left hand column in red ink. From 1853 the register records subsequent correspondence in a column headed "Result of Application" and from 1858 in a column headed "How Disposed Of".

    SUBJECT CLASSIFICATION

    Another development in conjunction with top-numbering was the introduction of subject classifications to aid retrieval of correspondence. When a file was closed and to be "put away" it was classified according to subject. In the register for 1851 the subject abbreviation under which the correspondence was filed is marked in the extreme right hand column: on the actual correspondence this is marked on the "docket". Top-numbered correspondence was filed according to the subject classification of the last letter. The letters "pa" (put away) are also found on most files. The correspondence appears to have been filed in annual single number order within the subject classifications in pigeon-hole cabinets/presses.
    Some particular types of correspondence, eg. enquires about naturalisation, were annotated with number and letter symbols suggesting they were filed in a series of alpha-numeric pigeon holes.

    Abbreviations for subject classifications used in the 1851 - 1863 period include:

    CA = Colonial Architect
    CAG = Colonial Agent General
    ELECT = Electoral
    JUD = Judicial
    MC = Municipal Corps
    MED = Medical
    MISC = Miscellaneous
    MISC.E = Miscellaneous Emigration
    M.C = Municipal Corporation
    OC = Other Colonies
    PMG = Post Master General
    POLICE = Police
    PP/PRIV PERS = Persons
    SHER = Sheriff
    STORES = Stores

    It would appear that the introduction of top-numbering and subject classification signify the abandonment of the "pure" annual single number system of arrangement. With top-numbering a constant re-arrangement of correspondence within the pigeon-holes would have had to occur as items were attached to each other. By introducing a subject classification, a relatively fixed location within the pigeon-hole press could be allocated to each "subject" and correspondence filed accordingly. Retrieval of correspondence was therefore made much easier.

    However as the correspondence for this period was completely re-arranged by Archives Division staff in 1957 it is impossible to state with accuracy the system of arrangement used by the registry.

    RE-ARRANGEMENT OF CORRESPONDENCE AFTER 1864

    In 1864 a new subject classification system was introduced. Classifications were broadened and subject variations were controlled through the use of a "Guide to the Office Records" which listed individual subjects against the broader groups they were to be filed under eg. letters from the Attorney General were now to be filed under "Govt.Depts" while correspondence from banks, churches, and hospitals was to be filed under "Public and Religious Bodies". (See VPRS 3991 Inward Registered Correspondence Part II).

    It is believed that when the new system of classification was introduced the older material from 1851 to 1863 was re-arranged according to the new subject classifications. The register and the correspondence for that period have had the earlier subject abbreviations crossed out and the new classifications imposed.

    ARRANGEMENT IMPOSED BY ARCHIVISTS BY 1957

    The following extract from a report written by M.Jones of the Archives Division, State Library of Victoria in 1957 indicates how the material was rearranged.

    "Probably when the labels were changed in 1864 a clerk altered all previous labels in the registers and on the letters back to 1851 when they were first employed. This introduced an arbitrary element because in many cases the new labelling was false, through inaccurate reading or a misunderstanding of the contents of the file and the necessity of using one of the chosen "new labels". For this reason and the fact that the correspondence of the 1850s is voluminous and most frequently in demand by research workers, I have preferred to arrange the Letters Received in groups according to the original abbreviated labels and not those added in 1864. The first archivist to work on the material arranged them in the 1854 grouping, which made much of the material practically inaccessible. My mistake however, has been to place the files in groups according to the label on the bottom letter where two or more papers were attached, instead of the top one. In this a personal choice was made by the archivist as an effort was made to place the file according to its subject matter. This makes for uncertainty and fallibility in locating files physically after pinpointing them in the register, and was made without recognition of giving the registry abbreviation to the last (chronologically) file received."
    From Inventory of the Records of the Chief Secretary's Office by M.Jones, Archives Division, State Library of Victoria, 1957.

    The re-arrangement of the records should be kept in mind when attempting to locate individual letters from this period. Researchers should search for both the registration number of the earliest letter as well as the registration number of the last letter within a top-numbered sequence.

    RELATED RECORDS

    Large files which would not fit in the pigeon holes were filed in deep drawers in the same cabinets or elsewhere in the registry. These files can be located in VPRS 1226 Supplementary Inward Registered Correspondence and VPRS 1192 Petitions.

    Outward registered correspondence from 1857 is located in VPRS 1187.


    EXCERPT TAKEN FROM INVENTORY OF THE RECORDS OF THE CHIEF SECRETARYS OFFICE PRODUCED BY AN ARCHIVES DIVISION STAFF MEMBER [M.Jones ?] IN 1957.

    see pp.17 - 19 & 29

    "All letters received by the Superintendent; s Office were entered in one registry group until Oct. 1847 and the beginning of separate Land Registry with the Order-In-Council and new land Regulations. Separate Land Registry lasted till October 1852.

    The fact of separate Land Registry must not be confused with the existence of the Land Branch within the Superintendent's and later Colonial Secretary's staff. Volumes labelled Land Branch cover the period Oct. 1847 to December 1855. From list of Branch divisions within Col. Sec's Office staff, Appendix V, Land Branch appears to end at 1855. The Land Registry volumes for registering separately letters received was only one phase of the Land Branch's activities which did not end with the abolition of the Land Registers.

    The Registers from October 1839 to June 1851 form a continuous series, that is, a new book was begun when the old one was filled, disregarding end of year divisions. The numbering system employed was the annually renewed singly consecutive number usually used in Victorian Government Departments, with chronological order of entries according to the date of receipt. In 1841-2 note was made in a column labelled "referring to" of the numbers of papers on the same subject, but, at this time, these were sometimes filed in numerical order, and sometimes attached one to the other, although later the patter practice became uniform. Most letters were referred to the Colonial Secretary, Sydney, which was recorded by Minutes in the Letter Books.

    In the 1844 Registry Book there probably occurs the first known reference in the total record group to "B.C" or "Blank Cover Reference". This type of entry indicates here a communication to the Superintendent of Port Phillip from His Excellency the governor, the letters "B,C" substituting for the Registry, or "Progressive" number. "Past papers" that is, former letters dealing with the same transaction were attached and filed with the latest paper on the matter. Reference in the relevant column gave the number of the last related file to be registered. The series continued in this manner until June 1851.

    At June 1851 there is a break in the Registry series due to the constitution of Victoria as an independent state, resultant administrative changes, and reorganisation of central authority around Colonials Secretary's Office, instead of Superintendent's Office.

    The same registry series and methods continued but renumbering commenced with the Col. Sec's administration. A similar break occurred in registers of Lands and Immigration Branches.

    The one significant change in the form of the entries in the Registry books was the addition of a column at the extreme right side of the page, in which was recorded an abbreviation according to the type of communication recorded. This was eventually done for each letter received , and continued in essence until 1884 in the Chief Secretary's Office. The same abbreviation appeared on the top left-hand corner of the letter itself. Examples from one page of the General Registry for Sept. 1851 give "Misc" (Miscellaneous), "Police", "O.C" (Other Colonies), "Sher" (Sheriff), "Elect" (Electoral), "C.A" (Colonial Architect), "P.M.G" (Post Master General), "M.C" (Municipal Corporation), "Jud" (Judicial). This column is headed "result of application" in 1852 book and in 1858 with a larger sized book this column was changed to " How Disposed Of".

    OCTOBER 1852 - 1863

    In 1852 a change was made in the overall system of registers employed in the Colonial Secretary's Office, probably because of the changing character of the correspondence being entered in the Lands Registers" with the gold discoveries letters concerning the gold fields and administration were entered in the Lands Registers and outnumbered those concerning Crown Lands. Therefore in 1852 the separate land Registry series was abandoned and all letter received by the Col. Sec 's Office were entered in one series of Registers. The numbers of letters already registered in the 1852 registers, Land and General were added and the numbering carried on from there. After this there was no structural change in registry methods except for using two registers [con]currently and differentiating between files of the same date by the letter symbol of the particular register used; this explains the letter used to identify a file as well as the number for the year and the Registry number itself, eg 56 T/786 on a file would signify the 786th letter entered in the 1856 register carrying the letter T on the spine; in actual fact there are six registers for 1856 T, V, W, X, Y, Z.

    The abbreviations in the registers and the corresponding labels on the letters I believe to be the basis of the finding system originally used for the Inward Correspondence. From the evidence of the grouping of the documents for the later years, viz. 1863 onwards in the form they arrived at the Library from the Department, and the form of the special Lands files found among the early documents of the group received from the Lands Department, the labels appear to by the key to the groupings and order once a document was "put away", or presumably, pigeonholed. Some particular types of documents eg. enquiries about naturalisation, received number and letter symbols which suggests a series of alphabetical pigeon holes.

    In the case of more than one letter on a particular transaction being attached to form a "file", the label on the uppermost, that is, the recent letter, being also the registry abbreviation, was the one used for the finding aid and the number name of the whole file was the registry no. of the latest letter. In the column, "result of application" or "how disposed of" for all other letters attached was written the registration number reference of the next letter (chronologically) received during the transaction. Because of this I think a "current" file, to use an anachronistic term, remained unlabelled until the matter was closed and the file was officially "put away". The letters "p.a" are found on most files.

    1864 - 1883

    In 1864 the character of the labels changed from a large varied and non-uniform collection of abbreviations to a smaller group of more constant labels, viz: Electoral, Government Departments, Internal Administration, Lunatic Asylum, Other Governments, P.& R.B. ( and Religious Bodies ?), Parliament, Pastoral, Personal, Police, Prisons.

    Government Departments, and P.& R.B. absorbed the more numerous labels.

    Letters received bound according to original bundles which were divided according to categories marked as labels on the outside end of each file. (consecutive number arrangement within each category - whole of one years correspondence still formed one simple single consecutive number series.

    The arrangement of the bundles according to the labels listed above stands as the original method of storing correspondence for the period 1863 - 1883. The documents were almost certainly received in that form, although all documents for years 1871 - 80 (inclusive) have been sorted out of the original order into the wide single consecutive number system, according to registration [number] order. The only good purpose this serves is to enable a quicker check of numbers of missing documents of there are a certain number, difficult to say how many. The original order should be restored (1) since it [the current order] is most certainly artificially created by archivists; for quick reference purposes.

    1884 - 1890

    The labels were dispensed with in Chief Secretary's Office procedure, and the documents presumably arranged (by Chief Sec.'s Office staff) in one whole single number series for each year.

    ARRANGEMENT USED [IMPOSED] BY ARCHIVISTS

    Probably when the labels were changed in 1864 a clerk altered all previous labels in the registers and on the letters back to 1851 when they were first employed. This introduced an arbitrary element because in many cases the new labelling was false, through inaccurate reading or a misunderstanding of the contents of the file and the necessity of using one of the chosen "new labels". For this reason and the fact that the correspondence of the 1850s is voluminous and most frequently in demand by research workers, I have preferred to arrange the Letters Received in groups according to the original abbreviated labels and not those added in 1864. The first archivist to work on the material arranged them in the 1854 grouping, which made much of the material practically inaccessible. My mistake however, has been to place the files in groups according to the label on the bottom letter where two or more papers were attached, instead of the top one. In this a personal choice was made by the archivist as an effort was made to place the file according to its subject matter. This makes for uncertainty and fallibility in locating files physically after pinpointing them in the register, and was made without recognition of giving the registry abbreviation to the last (chronologically) file received. In many cases the present arrangement will hold but they must be re-sorted using the abbreviations as groupings and with ample cross-referencing where necessary to link two or more groups. This latter has been done with the miscellaneous groups of correspondence from societies, institutions, Boards, banks, etc. for the period 1856 - 63.

More research resourcesMore research resources
    PROVguide052 Immigration Records
Indexes and RegistersIndexes and Registers
Display entries per page
Date Range Series Title Series Number
1851 - 1863 Register of Inward Correspondence I VPRS 1186
1851 - 1863 Index to Inward Registered Correspondence VPRS 1411
1851 - 1890 Index to References to Companies in VPRS 1189 Chief Secretary's Office Inwards Correspondence (Compiled by the Archives Division of the State Library of Victoria)(see Microfilm Cop VPRS 7153
Controlled SeriesControlled Series
Display entries per page
Date Range Series Title Series Number
Previous SeriesPrevious Series
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Transfer Date Series Title Series Number
0 - 1851 Inward Registered Correspondence to the Superintendent of Port Phillip District, relating to Aboriginal Affairs (refer to digitised images available online) VPRS 10
0 - 1851 Registered Inward Correspondence to the Superintendent of Port Phillip District from W. Thomas, Guardian of Aborigines and E.S. Parker, Assistant Protector of Aborigines. VPRS 2893
1847 - 1851 Inward Registered Correspondence VPRS 19
- 1852 Inward Registered Correspondence II [Land Branch] VPRS 2878
Subsequent SeriesSubsequent Series
Display entries per page
Transfer Date Series Title Series Number
0 - 1858 Chief Secretary's Registered, Inward Correspondence Relating To Aboriginal Affairs Transferred to The Department Of Crown Lands And Survey (Refer to Microfilm Copy, VPRS 4467) VPRS 4415
- 1863 Inward Registered Correspondence II VPRS 3991
List/s of records in this seriesList/s of records in this series
Display entries per page
Consignment Number Contents Date Range Public Access No. of Units
P0000 1851 - 1863 Open 874
Indexes and RegistersIndexes and Registers
Display entries per page
Date Range Series Title Series Number
1851 - 1863 Register of Inward Correspondence I VPRS 1186
1851 - 1863 Index to Inward Registered Correspondence VPRS 1411
1851 - 1890 Index to References to Companies in VPRS 1189 Chief Secretary's Office Inwards Correspondence (Compiled by the Archives Division of the State Library of Victoria)(see Microfilm Cop VPRS 7153
More research resourcesMore research resources
    PROVguide052 Immigration Records

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